A study on the economic impact of Israel’s new civil service

Engineering student Amira Zuhela has been working on a project to determine the economic impacts of Israel ‘s new civil services.

She hopes to provide a report on the implications of the new regulations, which will affect engineers and other professionals from all sectors of society.

Zuhelah, an engineering major at the Technion, is one of about 100 students from around the world participating in a new project that will help determine the impact of the reforms on the future of the country.

The project will be published in an upcoming issue of the International Journal of Technological Society.

The new legislation aims to ease the country’s burdensome bureaucracy, reduce red tape, create more opportunities for innovation and open up the public service to greater diversity.

The first draft of the legislation, passed by the Knesset in December, stipulates that civil servants will now have to have a masters degree, have five years of experience and have been working in the country for 10 years.

The legislation also mandates that civil service personnel must be over 50 years old and hold a post in public administration.

The Israeli government has been pushing for the reform since 2014, when the last civil service reform was announced.

Zuhemel says that it was a good idea in the beginning, but that it is now too late to implement reforms, particularly in light of the recent crisis in the financial sector.

“There is no guarantee that the new law will be enforced and implemented,” she says.

Zhuhemel’s project was funded by the Israeli Foundation for Economic Development, a group that works on behalf of the civil service.

“The law will increase the burden of government, but also make life harder for people,” she adds.

The law will make life easier for the government to fire civil servants.

“It will reduce the work load and make it easier for companies to hire people,” adds Zuselah.

The bill will also mean that there will be less competition in the civil services for jobs, and that there would be fewer opportunities for the entry of foreign students into Israel.

Zhuhemil says that this will make it harder for her and other students to study abroad.

The second draft of law passed in December sets the minimum age for entry into the civil servants’ service at 50 years, but does not specify the minimum number of years of service.

The minimum number for entry in the new civil servants was raised from 5 to 10 years, and is set to be increased to 25 years by 2020.

The number of employees who will be able to take on administrative positions is also set to increase.

“It is a very bad news,” says Zuherah, who says that she and other Israeli students are now studying abroad because they are concerned about their future prospects in the workplace.

Zuelha and other participants of the project say that the law will lead to higher costs for the country as a whole, as it will force the civil servant workforce to increase its hours of work and decrease its productivity.

“In the past, the average salary was about $30,000 a year, and it is set at $12,000,” says Zeinat Shabane, a student at the Hebrew University.

“Now, it will be about $60,000.”

Zuheleh, the engineering student, is a self-employed engineer.

She says that as a result, her salary will increase to $80,000.

“They will be asking for more money, which is not good,” she added.

Zuzhelah says that the civil engineering students, along with others from the Technio-technical college, the Technis Institute, and the Techniska University, will organize a workshop to talk about the changes in the law, including how it will affect them.

“This is the first time that a group of people has taken this kind of a step, and I hope that they will continue to take this step,” says Yitzhak Katz, an associate professor at the School of Engineering and the University of Haifa.

“I think that we will have a better picture of how this affects our future, especially if we take a closer look at the impact on the Israeli economy.”